to keep out of sth

by | May 7, 2019 | Phrasal verbs | 2 comments

to keep out of sth

by | May 7, 2019 | Phrasal verbs | 2 comments

This sentence contains the English phrasal verb 'to keep out of sth'. Do you know this phrasal verb? How much of the sentence can you understand?

Listen as many times as you need to, then check your understanding and practise using the new language.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask!

Language: B2 (Upper-Intermediate)  //  Accent: Ireland

Photo by Fred Mouniguet on Unsplash

This sentence contains the English phrasal verb 'to keep out of sth'. Do you know this phrasal verb? How much of the sentence can you understand?

 

Listen as many times as you need to, then check your understanding and practise using the new language.

 

If you have any questions, feel free to ask!

 

Language: B2 (Upper-Intermediate)  //  Accent: Ireland

 

Photo by Fred Mouniguet on Unsplash

. .
You’d of it. to make .
You’d better out of it. don’t want to make worse.

About the sentence

to keep (sb/sth) out of sth

'to keep out of sth' = to not get involved in something, such as an argument or a fight. e.g. "I always try to keep out of arguments when I'm visiting my parents. It isn't always easy though".

'to keep sb out of sth' is used when talking about someone preventing someone else from becoming involved in something. e.g. "As a parent, I always do my best to keep my children out of trouble". 

It can be useful to use this phrasal verb in a very direct way. 'Keep out of it!" is what you might say (if you were angry!) to someone who is trying to become involved in a private conversation. "Keep me out of it" is what you might say to someone who is trying to involve you in an argument, maybe by asking you to take a side

This phrasal verb can also be used to mean that you do not include something in a discussion, debate or argument. e.g. "Let's be professional and keep our personal lives out of this".


'Had better' is an important structure that is used to give strong, almost threatening advice. The idea is that if you don't do this thing, something bad might happen. e.g. "We'd better go to bed soon" (= if we don't, then we'll be tired in the morning).

Discussion questions:

Write your answers to these questions in the comments section, and I'll get back to you with some feedback:

  • Have you ever got involved in an argument and regretted it?

  • When you were growing up, did you manage to keep out of trouble?

  • Have you ever had to tell anyone to "keep out of it"?

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Marisela
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Marisela

I try hard to keep out of political arguments and debates because those kinds of talks tend to end up in heated debates. On the other hand, when we are growing up we might find a bit difficult to keep out of our friends’ personal life, especially out of their loving life. I remember a time when a friend of mine wanted me to get involved in a bitter argument with her boyfriend. As I didn’t want to add fuel to the fire, I had to tell her to keep me out of it. I remember that earlier I said… Read more »

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