to get your wires crossed

by | Last updated Apr 19, 2019 | Expressions | 0 comments

to get your wires crossed

by | Last updated Apr 19, 2019 | Expressions | 0 comments

This sentence contains the English expression 'to get your wires crossed'. Do you know this expression? How much of the sentence can you understand?

Listen as many times as you need to, then check your understanding and practise using the new language.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask!

Language: B2 (Upper-Intermediate)  //  Accent: Scottish

Photo by John Barkiple on Unsplash

This sentence contains the English expression 'to get your wires crossed'. Do you know this expression? How much of the sentence can you understand?

 

Listen as many times as you need to, then check your understanding and practise using the new language.

 

If you have any questions, feel free to ask!

 

Language: B2 (Upper-Intermediate)  //  Accent: Scottish

 

Photo by John Barkiple on Unsplash

. .
Let's this face. We our otherwise.
Let's about this to face. We get our crossed otherwise.

About the sentence

to get your wires crossed

When you get your wires crossed, you are confused about something or have misunderstood a person or a situation.

Although this expression can be used about an individual (e.g. I got my wires crossed), it is usually used to describe a situation in which two people have taken a different understanding from the same situation (such as when or where to meet each other). e.g. He wasn't expecting me for hours - I suppose we got our wires crossed.

A good time to use this expression is when you are dealing with or explaining a misunderstanding. The expression is used to say that the situation is an accident, and no one is to blame: Oh well! We must have got our wires crossed I suppose.

This expression can also be used as a noun phrase - crossed wires. e.g. I waited for him for ages but he didn't turn up. It's a case of crossed wires I suppose.


Otherwise = if not. e.g. We should go to bed soon, otherwise we'll be exhausted in the morning.

Let's + verb is a very useful way of introducing a suggestion. e.g. Let's have a takeaway tonight - I can't be bothered to cook.

Discussion question:

Write your answer to this question in the comments section, and I'll get back to you with some feedback:

  • When was the last time you got your wires crossed? What happened?

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