Micro-listening #16

by | Last updated Apr 19, 2019 | Specific information | 4 comments

Micro-listening #16

by | Last updated Apr 19, 2019 | Specific information | 4 comments

Micro-listenings are quick dictations and drills to help you develop your listening skills.

This exercise is designed to give you practice identifying very specific information, like numbers, times, places and statistics. This kind of listening is important in everyday life, but also for exams such as IELTS.

Listen as many times as you need to, and see how quickly you can correctly identify all the missing information. Good luck!

Please note - if you are writing a number, use numbers instead of words (e.g. write 10 instead of ten).

Source

This clip is from the How I Built This podcast, which looks at the stories behind the creation of well known companies by interviewing their founders. It's a brilliant podcast to listen to if you are interested in developing your business English! This episode features an interview with Stewart Butterfield, who created Slack. Photo by Pepi Stojanovski on Unsplash.

Accent

North American

Context

Stewart Butterfield is telling a story about leaving one of his first jobs.

And so around the end of of the I quit, I walked away. I thought I was walking away from like $ in equity, and I got bought out for, for $ on my way out. And of course, like later, later was the first dot com crash. And so in the end I got $ more than I would have had I stayed.

About the sentence

...in the end I got $35,000 more than I would have, had I stayed...

This is a good example of an advanced third conditional structure, which is often used to make language more formal or serious (especially in writing).

To form this structure, the order of the condition (the 'if' section) is inverted (switched) and the word 'if' is not used. The normal conditional in this clip would be: "I got $35,000 more than I would have, if I had stayed".

So for example, the sentence: "If I had studied, I would have passed" becomes: "Had I studied, I would have passed".

Basically, drop 'if' and then switch the first 2 words. Not too complicated, but it's a very advanced structure.

Can you give me your own example?

4
Practise new language, and feel free to ask any questions!

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Tanya
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Tanya

Great episode!
My examples:
I would have known English much better, had I kept practicing it.
He wouldn’t have run a maraphone, had he stopped after his first failure.

Marisela
Member
Marisela

Nice explaination.

Marisela
Member
Marisela

Hadn’t I swum vigorously to the shore, I would have drowned.

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Micro-listening #16

by | Last updated Apr 19, 2019 | Specific information | 4 comments

Micro-listenings are quick dictations and drills to help you develop your listening skills.

This exercise is designed to give you practice identifying very specific information, like numbers, times, places and statistics. This kind of listening is important in everyday life, but also for exams such as IELTS.

Listen as many times as you need to, and see how quickly you can correctly identify all the missing information. Good luck!

Please note - if you are writing a number, use numbers instead of words (e.g. write 10 instead of ten).

Source

This clip is from the How I Built This podcast, which looks at the stories behind the creation of well known companies by interviewing their founders. It's a brilliant podcast to listen to if you are interested in developing your business English! This episode features an interview with Stewart Butterfield, who created Slack. Photo by Pepi Stojanovski on Unsplash.

Accent

North American

Context

Stewart Butterfield is telling a story about leaving one of his first jobs.

And so around the end of of the I quit, I walked away. I thought I was walking away from like $ in equity, and I got bought out for, for $ on my way out. And of course, like later, later was the first dot com crash. And so in the end I got $ more than I would have had I stayed.

About the sentence

...in the end I got $35,000 more than I would have, had I stayed...

This is a good example of an advanced third conditional structure, which is often used to make language more formal or serious (especially in writing).

To form this structure, the order of the condition (the 'if' section) is inverted (switched) and the word 'if' is not used. The normal conditional in this clip would be: "I got $35,000 more than I would have, if I had stayed".

So for example, the sentence: "If I had studied, I would have passed" becomes: "Had I studied, I would have passed".

Basically, drop 'if' and then switch the first 2 words. Not too complicated, but it's a very advanced structure.

Can you give me your own example?

P

More exercises

P

More exercises

4
Practise new language, and feel free to ask any questions!

avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of
Tanya
Member
Tanya

Great episode!
My examples:
I would have known English much better, had I kept practicing it.
He wouldn’t have run a maraphone, had he stopped after his first failure.

Marisela
Member
Marisela

Nice explaination.

Marisela
Member
Marisela

Hadn’t I swum vigorously to the shore, I would have drowned.

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