Future predictions (part 2)

by | Last updated Apr 19, 2019 | Grammar | 0 comments

Future predictions (part 2)

by | Last updated Apr 19, 2019 | Grammar | 0 comments

In part 1 of this exercise, we learnt the following basic rule with making predictions in English:

Use going to + verb if the prediction is based on evidence

Use will + verb if the prediction is based on knowledge, opinion, feeling, instinct etc

In this exercise, we'll see a few examples of people making different kinds of predictions. For each one, think about the context and the reason why the speaker might be using will or going to.

Feel free to ask if you have any questions. Good luck!

Sentence 1 (accent: Ireland).

. .

I've play so badly. There's we're this game.

I've never us play so badly. There's no we're to win this game.

Language notes

The prediction here is based on evidence - the speaker can see that his team is playing badly, which is why he predicts that they will lose. 

Because it is a prediction based on evidence, the speaker uses going to + verb

Sentence 2 (accent: Northern England).

Iceland ? ; .

I you're Iceland this ? I'm ; you'll time.
I you're off Iceland this summer? I'm jealous; you'll an amazing time.

Language notes

The speaker used will here when she predicts that her friend will have an amazing time.

This suggests that the prediction is based on something she knows or has experienced. Maybe she has been to Iceland and knows how wonderful it is, or maybe she knows what kind of holiday her friend will like (because of her knowledge of her friend).

Sentence 3 (accent: English, RP).

- .

- I've the and you're fine.
Good - I've to the doctor and says you're to be fine.

Language notes

In this example, the fact that the doctor uses going to when he predicts that the person will be fine suggests that this is based on some kind of evidence - something that the doctor has seen (e.g. the results of some tests).

If the doctor used will instead of going to in this sentence, what would this communicate?

Sentence 4 (accent: English, RP).

? .

to see my new jacket? I'm you it it's lovely.

Do you to see my new jacket? I'm sure you like it but I it's lovely.

Language notes

The speaker here is talking to her friend, and she knows the kind of clothes that her friend likes and doesn't like. Her prediction about her friend not liking the jumper is based on this knowledge, which is why she uses will.

Practise new language, and feel free to ask any questions!

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Future predictions (part 2)

by | Last updated Apr 19, 2019 | Grammar | 0 comments

In part 1 of this exercise, we learnt the following basic rule with making predictions in English:

Use going to + verb if the prediction is based on evidence

Use will + verb if the prediction is based on knowledge, opinion, feeling, instinct etc

In this exercise, we'll see a few examples of people making different kinds of predictions. For each one, think about the context and the reason why the speaker might be using will or going to.

Feel free to ask if you have any questions. Good luck!

Sentence 1 (accent: Ireland).

. .

I've play so badly. There's we're this game.

I've never us play so badly. There's no we're to win this game.

Language notes

The prediction here is based on evidence - the speaker can see that his team is playing badly, which is why he predicts that they will lose. 

Because it is a prediction based on evidence, the speaker uses going to + verb

Sentence 2 (accent: Northern England).

Iceland ? ; .

I you're Iceland this ? I'm ; you'll time.
I you're off Iceland this summer? I'm jealous; you'll an amazing time.

Language notes

The speaker used will here when she predicts that her friend will have an amazing time.

This suggests that the prediction is based on something she knows or has experienced. Maybe she has been to Iceland and knows how wonderful it is, or maybe she knows what kind of holiday her friend will like (because of her knowledge of her friend).

Sentence 3 (accent: English, RP).

- .

- I've the and you're fine.
Good - I've to the doctor and says you're to be fine.

Language notes

In this example, the fact that the doctor uses going to when he predicts that the person will be fine suggests that this is based on some kind of evidence - something that the doctor has seen (e.g. the results of some tests).

If the doctor used will instead of going to in this sentence, what would this communicate?

Sentence 4 (accent: English, RP).

? .

to see my new jacket? I'm you it it's lovely.

Do you to see my new jacket? I'm sure you like it but I it's lovely.

Language notes

The speaker here is talking to her friend, and she knows the kind of clothes that her friend likes and doesn't like. Her prediction about her friend not liking the jumper is based on this knowledge, which is why she uses will.

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