Future predictions (part 1)

by | Last updated Apr 19, 2019 | Grammar | 0 comments

Future predictions (part 1)

by | Last updated Apr 19, 2019 | Grammar | 0 comments

In this exercise, we'll see a couple of ways that we can make predictions in English. This area is tricky because you need to be careful to use the correct structure for the kind of prediction you are making.

This exercise contains 2 micro-dictations, both of which make predictions. See how much you can understand, and then read the explanation for why a specific future form is used.

Feel free to ask any questions if you are unsure about anything. Good luck!

When I was growing up, I used to go on holiday to Corfu with my family. We had to get a taxi from the airport to the place we were staying, which took about an hour along a very windy road.

My little sister gets very car sick, and she used to throw upvomit during the journey every year - not a nice start to the holiday!

Imagine we are in the taxi and have left the airport. Here are two predictions we might make about my sister:

Sentence 1 (accent: Northern England).

, !

car, she's sick!

the car, she's to sick!

Language notes

In this example, we use going to + verb because the prediction is based on some kind of evidence. In this case, it is probably the fact that my sister looks pale, unwell, nauseous etc.

Sentence 2 (accent: English, RP).

.

a bag with us sick at .

We take a bag with us she'll be sick at point.

Language notes

In this example, we use will + verb because the prediction is based on knowledge, experience, instinct or feeling. In this case, we make the prediction because we know that my sister is always sick on this journey - we have the experience of her doing it every year.

Note that, at this point, my sister probably looks fine. There is no evidence that she will be sick at some point, but we know that it will probably happen - that's why we use will and not going to to make the prediction.

Practise new language, and feel free to ask any questions!

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Future predictions (part 1)

by | Last updated Apr 19, 2019 | Grammar | 0 comments

In this exercise, we'll see a couple of ways that we can make predictions in English. This area is tricky because you need to be careful to use the correct structure for the kind of prediction you are making.

 

This exercise contains 2 micro-dictations, both of which make predictions. See how much you can understand, and then read the explanation for why a specific future form is used.

 

Feel free to ask any questions if you are unsure about anything. Good luck!

When I was growing up, I used to go on holiday to Corfu with my family. We had to get a taxi from the airport to the place we were staying, which took about an hour along a very windy road.

 

My little sister gets very car sick, and she used to throw upvomit during the journey every year - not a nice start to the holiday!

 

Imagine we are in the taxi and have left the airport. Here are two predictions we might make about my sister:

Sentence 1 (accent: Northern England).

, !

car, she's sick!

the car, she's to sick!

Language notes

In this example, we use going to + verb because the prediction is based on some kind of evidence. In this case, it is probably the fact that my sister looks pale, unwell, nauseous etc.

Sentence 2 (accent: English, RP).

.

a bag with us sick at .

We take a bag with us she'll be sick at point.

Language notes

In this example, we use will + verb because the prediction is based on knowledge, experience, instinct or feeling. In this case, we make the prediction because we know that my sister is always sick on this journey - we have the experience of her doing it every year.

Note that, at this point, my sister probably looks fine. There is no evidence that she will be sick at some point, but we know that it will probably happen - that's why we use will and not going to to make the prediction.

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